Mustang

MUSTANG FACTS: 1974 – 1982 • The completely redesigned Mustang II was introduced in 1974. Compared with the 1973 model, the Mustang II was 19 inches shorter and 490 pounds lighter. It was available in a notchback, including a luxury Ghia model and a 2+2 fastback. For the first time, there was no V-8 engine and no Mustang convertible option available. • An orange 1973 Mustang Mach I was featured in a prominent role in the action movie Gone in 60 Seconds, which debuted in 1974. • In 1975, V-8 power returned to the Mustang. But the 302-cid V-8 engine produced only 130 horsepower and came only with an automatic transmission. • The Cobra II package joined the lineup in 1976, replete with non-functional hood scoop, racing stripes and front and rear spoilers. Available in white with blue stripes, blue with white stripes, and black with gold stripes, the Cobra II was intended to recall the looks of the famed Shelby Mustangs. • In an attempt to appeal to convertible fans, fastback models became available with T-Top removable glass roof panels. A new Sports Performance Package added a four-speed manual transmission to the 302-cid V-8. • In 1978, the new King Cobra model was the first Mustang to wear a 5.0 badge – the metric equivalent of 302 cubic inches. • The new “Fox” platform made its debut in 1979. The new model was longer and taller than the Mustang II, yet it was 200 pounds lighter. A sleek, “Euro” design replaced many traditional Mustang styling cues. Engine choices included a 2.3-liter four-cylinder, a 2.8-liter V-6, a 3.3-liter inline six-cylinder and a 140-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8. • In 1980, the 302-cid V-8 engine was dropped and replaced by an economy-minded 119-horsepower, 255-cid V-8 derivative. • In 1981, performance headed to the back burner, as the turbo four-cylinder was dropped from the Mustang engine lineup and new emissions controls dropped the 255-cid V-8’s power to 115 horsepower. • In 1982, the Mustang GT returned after a 12-year absence. The 5.0-liter V-8, which delivered 157 horsepower was also back, and optional T-Tops returned. MUSTANG FACTS: 1983 – 1993 • By 1983, the Mustang convertible was back. And so was the “Boss,” as Ford’s pony car steadily returned to its roots as a performance vehicle, following the gas crisis and tighter emissions standards that influenced the Mustangs of the 70s. • In 1984, Ford’s Special Vehicle Operations (SVO) team created the Mustang SVO. It sported a front fascia with fog lamps, functional hood scoop and a unique dual-wing rear spoiler. A turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine produced 175 horsepower. • Also in 1984, a special V-8 powered Mustang GT was created to commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Mustang. It was a special limited edition done in Oxford White with a Canyon Red interior. • In 1985, Mustang received a 5.0-liter high output V-8 that made 210 horsepower when mated to a manual transmission. New Quadra-Shock rear suspension provided better acceleration and reduced wheel hop on fast takeoffs. • Mustang’s V-8 traded its carburetor for sequential multi-port fuel injection in 1986. • In 1987, the Mustang was restyled with a new “aero-look” body. The 5.0-liter V-8 produced 225 horsepower. • For its 25th Anniversary, all Mustangs produced between April 17, 1989 and April 17, 1990 sported the familiar running horse on the dashboard with “25 Years” inscribed underneath. • In 1990, Mustang sported a driver’s-side airbag as standard equipment. • In 1991, entry-level Mustangs received an improved 105-horsepower, twin-plug 2.3-liter four-cylinder with distributorless ignition. All V-8 models came with new five-spoke 16 x 7-inch cast aluminum wheels. • The stealthy Mustang LX 5.0 developed a cult following in 1992 and outsold all other models combined. Wire-style wheel covers and whitewall tires disappeared from the options list. • In 1993, Ford’s new Special Vehicle Team (SVT) introduced the limited-production SVT Mustang Cobra with subtle but distinctive styling cues and performance upgrades. The low-volume 1993 Cobra R, developed to be used as a race car, sold out prior to production. MUSTANG FACTS: 1994 – PRESENT • The 1994 Mustang, which ushered in the fourth generation of Mustangs, was dramatically restyled to evoke its pony car heritage. The hatchback style was dropped, leaving the two-door coupe and convertible. The SVT (Special Vehicle Team) Cobra launched with a 240-horsepower 5.0-liter V-8. • 1995 was the final model year for the 5.0-liter V-8, which began life as the 260- and later 289-cid engine. The second SVT Cobra R was introduced with a 300-horsepower 5.8-liter V-8 and five-speed manual transmission. • In 1996, Mustang GTs and SVT Mustang Cobras were equipped for the first time with 4.6-liter Dual Overhead Cam (DOHC) V-8, which produced 305 horsepower. • Ford’s Passive Anti-Theft System became standard on all models in 1997. • In 1998, the output of Mustang GT’s 4.6-liter V-8 was increased to 225 horsepower. • A redesigned Mustang debuted in 1999. It sported sharper lines, pronounced wheel arches plus new hood, grille, fascias and lamps. The SVT Mustang Cobra became the first Mustang with independent rear suspension. The 4.6-liter DOHC V-8 produced 320 horsepower. • In 2000, the third Mustang SVT Cobra R was produced in a 300-unit run. It came with a 386-horsepower, 5.4-liter DOHC V-8 mated to Mustang’s first ever six-speed transmission. • Inspired by the 1968 movie, the first Mustang Bullitt GT model was offered. It featured unique side scoops, 17-inch “Bullitt”-styled wheels and lowered and specially-tuned suspension. • In 2002, production ended for two of Mustang’s closest competitors: Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird. • The Mach I returned in 2003 with a 305-horsepower V-8 under a signature ram-air “Shaker” hood scoop. The supercharged SVT Mustang Cobra produced 390 horsepower. • In 2004, Ford produced its 300 millionth car – a Mustang GT convertible 40th anniversary edition. The 2004 models were the last cars built at Ford’s fabled Dearborn Assembly Plant, which built Mustangs since the car’s 1964 introduction. • In 2005, production of the all-new Mustang moved to Flat Rock, Mich. Plant. The Mustang’s V-6 engine was increased to 4.0-liters and the V-8 increased to 300 horsepower. • The V-6 “Pony Package” debuted in 2006. GT models got 18-inch wheels, and owners could configure instrument panel lighting in 125 different colors, an industry first, using Ford’s MyColor instrument gauge. • In 2007, Ford introduced a special “Warriors in Pink” Mustang, designed to help raise funds for Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure breast cancer research. The vehicle lineup also included the Mustang Shelby GT and the Shelby GT500KR. The second limited-edition Mustang Bullitt was introduced in November. • The 9 millionth Mustang – a GT convertible – was built in 2008 and sold to an Iowa farmer. • The 2009 Mustang features a glass roof option and special 45th anniversary badging. • The 2010 Mustang was introduced in November at the Los Angeles Auto Show. It cleverly combines modern technology with Mustang heritage and a V-8 with even more horsepower. throati •

aj on twitter aj on facebook